How To Sleep Better for Sperm

Sleep Naked to Improve Sperm Count and Sperm Quality

DID YOU KNOW?

Sleep deprivation is prevalent and increasing in the developed world.
But if you're willing to experiment a bit, sleep might be one of the areas where you can turn up the dial on better sperm. 

SLEEP AND TESTOSTERONE

Testosterone is an essential precursor for proper sperm formation. The majority of a man's daily testosterone release occurs during sleep, and testosterone levels peak at the end of a solid sleep. A recent study found sleep restriction can lower testosterone by 10-15% after just 1 week. The long-term effects of sleep restriction on testosterone production are potentially more severe. 

SLEEP AND FERTILITY

A recent large study found both short and long sleep dramatically reduced fertility. Men who slept less than 6 or more than 9 hours per night had 40 percent reduced probability of conception in any given month.

QUALITY OF SLEEP

It's not just about how many hours you're in the bed. A 2008 study found that disturbed sleep such as from sleep fragmentation and obstructive sleep apnea are associated with reduced testosterone levels. 

SLEEP NAKED

It's well known that raised temperatures on the scrotum will negatively affect sperm count and sperm quality. During the daytime, grab an Underdog kit to keep your cool. And at nighttime, sleep without any underwear or bottoms. This permits your scrotum to expand as needed to keep the testicles cool. Yes it takes a few nights to get used to free-balling. But it's worth the effort.

SLEEP COOL

A study of sleep conditions found hot bedding or high room temperature led to lower quality sleep (decreased slow wave/REM sleep, and increased wakefulness). To combat this, adjust your thermostat to make your room temperature consistently cool all night long. Strip away excess bedding. Wear only cotton or silk fibers, and avoid synthetics like polyester, which can trap heat. Aim for consistency every night, to help you dial-in the right temperature.

SCREENS OFF 60 MINS BEFORE BED

The light emitted from our smartphones and tablets includes greater short-wavelength light in the blue light range, which has been shown to induce stronger melatonin-suppressing responses [study]. Melatonin is important to induce sleep. In fact travelers and those with difficulty sleeping regularly take melatonin an hour or two before bed to nudge their bodies into dreamland. So turn on your device's blue light filters. Or better yet, turn off the devices an hour before bed and try a conversation, a paper book, or a podcast instead.

MAKE SLEEP YOUR PRIORITY

Yes, work & play are constantly vying for our attention. But we're not superhuman. And realize just because you're "getting by" with the sleep patterns you have, you might be well-short of the sleep you need for peak health. Make your health and your 7-8 hours of sleep a priority every night.